🎰 Watch the films directed by Benny Safdie on Fandor

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Adam Sandler stars in a new short film from his “Uncut Gems” directors Josh and Benny Safdie, “Goldman v. Silverman.”.


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Josh and Benny Safdie just shared a new short film 'Goldman v Silverman,' starring Benny and Adam Sandler as dueling street performers.


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The Ralph Handel Story.


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Josh and Benny Safdie just shared a new short film 'Goldman v Silverman,' starring Benny and Adam Sandler as dueling street performers.


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We're Going To The Zoo.


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The Ralph Handel Story.


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An editorial-illustrator turned award-winning documentary filmmaker, Mickey Duzyj parlayed his breakthrough short film into a Netflix series—one that poignantly.


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The Ralph Handel Story.


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So, here's a fun thing: the Safdie Brothers, whose Uncut Gems was one of our absolute favorite movies of , apparently shot an entire short.


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Another cringe inducing Safdie brothers' short that pays off if you watch it all the way through. Where their previous short The Ralph Handel Story was painfully.


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The Safdies filmed outside during a brutally cold winter fortnight, subsisting largely on trail mix made by a member of the crew; by the end of the shoot, they looked about as ragged as the people on the other side of the camera. But he transmitted to his sons an attention to the characters of the city, and an obsession with film. And he just got sucked back into that world. But the man shouting his name was not a friend, just a mischievous Googler—who also happens to be one of the most acclaimed film directors in the world. By then, they had co-founded a do-it-yourself filmmaking collective called Red Bucket, and begun paying special attention to films that blurred the line between fiction and documentary. The brothers are always looking for ways to combine scripted storytelling with scenes from everyday life. Benny customarily holds the boom microphone, talking quietly to the actors and—directly into the microphone—even more quietly to his brother. Many viewers may have been too dazzled by the action to notice the obstacle that the brothers put in their own path. On the red carpet, Sandler worked the media alongside many of the colorful characters who fill out the film. Stoudemire was not cast, partly because he declined to shave his dreadlocks, which he did not have in his playing years. Mike Francesa, the sports-radio fixture, plays a bookie; Wayne Diamond, an astonishingly tanned fashion designer, plays a high roller; Keith Williams Richards, a former longshoreman, plays a tough guy—his first acting job, though possibly not his first time acting tough. This is just how he is. The Safdies spent their boyhood shuttling between Queens, with their father, and Manhattan, where their mother lived with their stepfather, who worked in finance. Aaron Smith! But the brothers were determined to avoid easy sentiment and easily sympathetic characters. It showed Sandler, resplendent in big white teeth and little rimless glasses, stalking the streets of the Diamond District, alternately triumphant and pathetic, as people shout his name. Sometimes they became aware that he had been secretly filming them, which made them both self-conscious and curious. For a while, Jonah Hill was attached, but then the brothers decided that he was too young, right around the time Hill decided that he was too busy. When it was over, and the audience was happily dazed, the Safdies and their collaborators shuffled onstage. The Safdies, like most people who were teen-agers in the nineteen-nineties, grew up on Adam Sandler, whose seemingly simple comedy is driven by a feral spirit. A decade older than the brothers, Bronstein can serve as a figure of restraint. Then he saw the platoon of trucks parked around the corner and remembered that he was involved in a major production, much too big to be surreptitious. In the course of filming, Sandler came to be treated as an honorary member of the Forty-seventh Street fraternity.{/INSERTKEYS}{/PARAGRAPH} The Safdies love crosstalk and ambient sound; they hate the idea of forcing actors to deliver credible dialogue in artificial silence. A security guard, a few rows closer to the court, gestured downward with his palms: Quiet, please. But he has done almost no acting since then; instead, he has become the third member of Team Safdie. So they resolved to create something new for him. Josh began hanging out on Forty-seventh Street, trying to penetrate the world of jewellers, while also turning out short films and documentaries. One scene is a frenzied sprint through the New World Mall, in Flushing; the brothers had permission to shoot there, but they showed up without warning and shot largely with hidden cameras, as if they were still running a guerrilla operation. To underscore the sense of physical push and pull, they managed to make a violent action movie with no guns. The film radiates outward from Howard, who revels, Safdie-like, in travelling between worlds: we follow him to a Passover Seder, where he encounters the ten plagues, and to a night club, where he encounters the R. Scott, the Times critic. He sees other people getting their ass kissed and he wants his own big moment. His name is Josh Safdie, and he is thirty-five; he and his brother, Benny Safdie, who is two years younger, have directed a series of movies that have been increasingly ambitious and increasingly popular. Caleb Landry Jones, an emerging movie star, played her abusive but somehow mesmerizing part-time boyfriend, Ilya. Most of all, they resist the idea that movie characters must learn and grow; their heroes tend to be stubbornly stuck. For a while, they talked to Joel Embiid, the Cameroonian star of the Philadelphia 76ers, but then it turned out that the movie would be shooting, inconveniently, during basketball season. The Safdies have found that a useful tension is generated when professional actors are forced to contend with people playing themselves. Garnett, during his playing days, liked to present himself as an implacable warrior. Safdie paid Holmes to write her life story, which she did, often by using display laptops at a nearby Apple Store. He had a number of acting opportunities, but ended up back in jail on drug charges. The early Safdie films were nearly twee, because the main characters tended to be wistful and a little restless. Partly in self-defense, they started commandeering the camera to make their own films: goofy horror movies, parody documentaries, even an anti-smoking propaganda film, starring Josh as a smoker who suddenly dies. They worked with Sean Price Williams , one of the most celebrated cinematographers in independent film, who shot with long lenses, from a distance, so as not to disturb the actors or alert the authorities there were no filming permits involved ; the action unfolds in tense, unsteady closeups. One afternoon, at a cheap Thai restaurant in midtown, Josh Safdie tried to explain his complicated feelings about his chosen profession. A young boy was sitting directly in front of the Safdies, and Josh made a semi-successful effort to moderate his language. Instead, they take an approach that is at once more generous and more unsparing, refusing to either condemn their characters or prettify them. Benny is the quieter of the two, but he is the more dedicated performer. Mesmerized by an image of Holmes from the film, heavy-lidded and lit in purples and pinks, he e-mailed the Safdies to say that he wanted to work with them. {PARAGRAPH}{INSERTKEYS}During every New York Knicks home game, the scoreboard at Madison Square Garden displays a message asking fans to refrain from disruptive behavior. What the fuck are you doing? Neistat and his brother Van made imaginative viral videos, including one in which Van illegally bicycled through the Holland Tunnel; a few years later, they got an HBO show. When the brothers were hired by the Turtle Conservancy, a conservationist group, they produced a series of standard celebrity public-service announcements, and then something very different: a four-minute fake documentary about a rare-animal smuggler in a hotel penthouse in Hong Kong, which was so realistic that the Conservancy had to issue a statement reassuring viewers that although the problem was real, the film was make-believe. Jones disappeared into the role so completely that people on the street sometimes mistook him for the real Ilya and, accordingly, tried to either calm him down or fight him. The brothers agreed, and after the shoot they asked him to help them edit. The brothers arranged for her to go to rehab once filming was done. The brothers have said that these racial disparities were intentional: they were filming in , and wanted to reflect the cruelty and confusion that they perceived all around them. Thanks to the marketable presence of Pattinson, the film had a reported budget of about four and a half million dollars. The Safdies aim less to edify audiences than to envelop them: they want to create immersive experiences, which generally requires that they immerse themselves. If the extras caught someone gawking at Sandler, or at the camera, they were instructed to create a simple distraction: approach the gawker and, posing as a tourist, ask for directions to the nearest subway station. Like many people who like to get into a bit of trouble, Josh has a corresponding knack for talking himself out of it. Moviegoers hoping to avoid spoilers should avoid learning anything about the playoffs. Bronstein describes the difference between the brothers in bluntly Freudian terms. When Garnett suggests that Howard exploited the Ethiopians by underpaying for the opal, Howard defends himself with a basketball analogy. Aaron Smith was indeed one of the referees that night, working a pre-season game between the Knicks and the New Orleans Pelicans. Sometimes the Safdies seem to know everyone in the city, although not everyone in the city knows them. So they returned to Sandler, this time with extra muscle: Martin Scorsese, who had signed on as executive producer. Now they were preparing a special mix for the Dolby Atmos system, which allows filmmakers to create the sensation that sounds are emanating from specific places in a room. He wants his big day. Bronstein considered the worst-case scenario. Alberto Safdie was by all accounts an unpredictable father; the brothers remember spending days at home alone, locked in a small bedroom, with a pile of comic books and basketball cards. When the brothers are on set, Josh generally takes a position behind the monitors, shouting out suggestions to the actors. Of the two, Josh Safdie tends to be the instigator, driven by instinct and daring. The idea was to create a film that felt romantic, without romanticizing the addiction and the violence in it. For street scenes, the Safdies assembled about a hundred extras, who mingled with people going about their business. Which moments did their father consider worth filming? The Safdies have long resisted the idea that filmmaking should be morally instructive, with admirable heroes and clearly identified villains. Since then, though, Holmes has faded from view. Benny Safdie decided to play the role himself. The brothers used N. On the press tour, Jones, their star, was mumbly and glassy-eyed, as if he were having trouble getting out of character. The bigger challenge was casting Howard: he needed to be Jewish, and he needed to be riveting, but beyond that the brothers were flexible. The Safdies were gratified to see images on Twitter of fans dressed as Howard for Halloween—six weeks before the movie came out. They tried to get the script to Sandler. For years, the brothers were do-it-yourself visionaries, finding ingenious ways to make their little movies seem big; they used the city as their soundstage in part because it was free. Near the end comes an audacious scene, enabled by special effects, that makes viewers wonder if anything else was fake. In Boston, they studied with Ted Barron, a historian of contemporary independent American film, who was impressed by their industriousness. They turned out to be Sage and Frey Ranaldo, the sons of Lee Ranaldo, the Sonic Youth guitarist, and Leah Singer, an artist; the boys agreed to act in the movie, and their parents appeared as their stepfather and their mother. Neistat remembers the Safdies as adventurous but cerebral. Each time the player changed, the script needed to change, too. Not long after Benny was born, Alberto bought a video camera and began making home movies. On this day, the brothers were trying to make the mix a little clearer, to allow viewers to separate the voices from the noise. Josh talked quietly for a few minutes, then hung up and turned to his brother. But Williamson had foiled their plans by tearing his meniscus, so the brothers had to find other ways to entertain themselves. On a recent afternoon, he was sitting in a chair on lime-green carpet, undistracted by the city noises leaking in from two sources: Broadway, through the window, and a cluster of editing screens, through the door. But he felt confident that it would find an audience. They graduated from Columbia Grammar and Preparatory School, a private institution on the Upper West Side; in the early two-thousands, they arrived, a year apart, at Boston University. But there were some dissenters, notably A. While the brothers orchestrate spectacles, his job has often been to make sure that quiet, intimate moments ring true.